On this page I tried to show how much work goes into traditional upholstery. Its not quite finished yet but I will be updating it over the next few days..

chesterfield partially stripped
This poor sofa had all sorts crammed into it to try and fix the seat but really there was nothing for it but to strip to the frame and build it back up.

victorian drop-arm sofa bare frame
Stripped clean, ready for building up again. The top rail on the drop-arm had split and needed replacing. The dropping mechanism was replaced and oiled to make sure it moved smoothly.

victorian drop-arm sofa bare frame
The first job is to stretch webbing across the back and fixed arm. New springs are stapled to the frame or stitched to the webbing and then these springs are lashed together and secured to the frame.

Chesterfield sofa showing hair stuffing
The springs are covered with strong hessian that is fitted and attached to the frame. The top of each spring is stitched to the hessian to keep them in place. This is when the sofa starts to take shape. The hessian is then cover with the first stuffing of animal hair. This stuffing is quite deep and dense and care is taken to maintain the sofa’s shape.

Chesterfield sofa showing hair stuffing
The first stuffing is covered with a looser weave hessian which is shaped and attached to the frame. A long double pointed needle is used to put stitches through the stuffing and both layers of hessian.
Around the front edge of the arm several rows of stitching are used to form a strong edge to hold the next layers of stuffing in shape.

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